Winter in Iceland – Know before you go

Wondering why your friends and family look aghast each time you tell them your plans to visit Iceland in the coldest month of the year? Well, they have every right to raise concerns especially when you’re Indian, have no experience driving in snow and wear sweaters in the tropics. Therefore, in order to alleviate those concerns we’ve chalked out a winter in Iceland survivors guide so you (wherever you may come from) are well prepared for the ride of your life.

KNOW BEFORE YOU GO:

  • It is possible to see sun, snow, rain, sleet and hail all within 1 hour of being in Iceland. Therefore, it is vital to check the weather updates before you begin your day and subsequently every two hours. This will give you 100% accurate information on whether the roads are accessible or if a detour is required. 2 weather websites we used along the way:

http://safetravel.is/

http://en.vedur.is/

http://www.road.is/

  • Drive safe, slow and obey traffic rules.
  • Rent a 4X4 (four wheel drive) only. If you happen to follow the above itinerary in winter a 4WD is necessary.
  • Do not book a northern lights tour. Due to the entire country being sparsely populated you can often see the lights from your guesthouse window. We do not recommend a tour as they are expensive with no guarantee, take away the element of surprise and excitement and the phenomenon is purely based on luck.
  • Stock up on food in case you get caught up in a storm and cannot reach your accommodation.
  • Ensure you have all the emergency helpline numbers, register your itinerary on safetravel.is for instant support, keep a shovel in your car and always help passersby in case you see anyone stuck.
  • Layer up because the only way to protect yourself from the cold is by wearing countless layers of clothing so pack smart. Always keep your head, hands and ears covered from the harsh winds.
  • Carry multiple power chargers as your battery tends to train very quickly in such extreme temperatures.
  • Iceland is EXPENSIVE (understatement) so budget your travels accordingly. Stock up on supermarket goodies, which can be used for lunch in case you plan to spend more on dinner.
  • The water at Lake Myvatn smells horrible due to the high Sulphur content but it is absolutely safe to drink (no one buys water in Iceland, do not embarrass yourself by doing so).
  • Limited daylight means you have to plan your itinerary for the day accordingly. It is not advisable to drive post sunset unless you step out a few kilometres for dinner or to chase the lights.
  • Thermal pools ruin your hair (suplhur again) so always apply conditioner before entering the pools/baths.
  • Go cashless – We have no idea what the Icelandic currencly looks like as we only used our travel cards and soon learned that purchases are very rarely made in cash.
  • Fuel up every time you see a gas station as when you’re driving cross country in winter you don’t know when your next stop could be.
  • Northern lights sightings are not as easy as they make it look as Iceland experiences a variety of changing weather therefore clear skies on a dreary winter’s day is not a guarantee.
  • Blue Lagoon tickets need to be purchased well in advance on their official website(especially in summer).
  • Everyone in Iceland speaks perfect English so you will never face any language trouble.
  • Alcohol cannot be bought in super markets (except for beer) so BYOB.
  • Have you ever wondered what takes place prior to entering the baths/pools? This time is spent running from your toasty changing rooms, stepping on to the icy ground, clutching the frosty handles of the pool until you have finally made it inside. So mentally prepare.
  • Truly the best way to see the country is by renting your own vehicle however if you are apprehensive about driving, you can find countless (expensive) tours for sightseeing.
  • Finally, brace yourselves for you may never want to leave this country.

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